| Date: 16-09-19  Time: 00:54 am
collapse

* User Info

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

* Recent Posts

VCPD:Spada by Spadaa
[Yesterday at 13:19:52]


[PBA#42] SAPD Application - Gabriel Pink by Spike
[September 13, 2019, 00:19:26 am]


[PBA#42] SAPD Application - Gabriel Pink by Gabriel_Pink
[September 12, 2019, 19:30:33 pm]


Re: ARPD Promotions & Awards by Spike
[September 11, 2019, 00:20:18 am]


Re: VCPD - VCPR by Klaus
[September 11, 2019, 00:15:01 am]

* Who's Online

  • Dot Guests: 77
  • Dot Hidden: 0
  • Dot Users: 2
  • Dot Users Online:

* Search


Author Topic: San Andreas Police Department - MANUAL [2019]  (Read 1086 times)

Spike and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Spike

  • SA:MP Manager
  • [SA:MP] Deputy Chief of Police
  • *******
  • Posts: 854
  • A leader leads by example, not by force.
  • With us since: 30/04/2013
    YearsYearsYearsYearsYearsYears
  • Badge-ID: #100
  • SA-MP: James_Robinson
San Andreas Police Department - MANUAL [2019]
« on: March 10, 2019, 12:39:57 pm »

Deputy Chief of Police James Robinson
Internal Affairs Commanding Officer | Chief of Detectives
San Andreas Police Department - "To protect and serve"


Online Spike

  • SA:MP Manager
  • [SA:MP] Deputy Chief of Police
  • *******
  • Posts: 854
  • A leader leads by example, not by force.
  • With us since: 30/04/2013
    YearsYearsYearsYearsYearsYears
  • Badge-ID: #100
  • SA-MP: James_Robinson
Re: San Andreas Police Department - MANUAL [2019]
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2019, 12:40:11 pm »
Department Structure


STAFF Officers:
  • Chief of Police (CoP): (/)
The highest authority figure in the department. As the man responsible for leading the department with his fellow Deputy CoP, as well being the highest rank in the chain of command, the job of the Chief of Police (CoP) is to make sure that the department and its divisions run like a well-oiled mechanism, filling the roles that are not currently occupied by members, and helping in the training of new staffs. As a member of the Board of Chiefs, he must be sworn either in harmony from the members of the group or by the Board of Police Commissioners. The Chief of Police is not allowed to be corrupt in any sort of form, be it In-Character and/or Out of Character. The Chief of Police is also a member of the Internal Affairs, albeit not the principal member overseeing it, as that responsibility falls to the Deputy Chief. Should the Chief of Police be found violating his duties, he's eligible to be removed by the same Internal Affairs of which he is a member of, and be replaced his deputy unless a consensus involving the majority of Command Staff is obtained for new members as STAFF Officers.

  • Deputy Chief of Police (Deputy CoP): (/)
The Deputy Chief answers only to the Chief and Board of Commissioners. The holder of this rank is also the Chief of the Internal Affairs division and has full authority over the department. However, if a consensus involving the majority of Command Staff is obtained they can be removed from office. The Deputy Chief is the one which handles reports and corruption cases throughout the department regardless of the rank and consults with members of the Internal Affairs division for their input. He is often the one in charge of the Sergeant Training Program, however, that task can often be handled by a Captain.

Command Officers:
  • Captain: (/)
The de-facto leader of the Departmental Bureaus. There can be only one Captain, and his job is oto oversee all three bureaus and their respective command, he has full authority over the SAPD's bureaus and reports directly to the Chiefs of Police. His job is also to assign and supervise Lieutenants in leading specific bureaus and second in command. These are often refered to as Commanding Officers of their respective bureau.

  • Lieutenant: (/)
Lieutenant is the lowest rank of the command officers, they are refered to as Watch Commanders and are tasked with handing out assignments on a biweekly basis to all field personnel and police supervisors in the department, they can be given second in command over a bureau by the Police Captain and recieve the title of the Commanding Officer of said bureau, normally the only bureaus assigned Lieutenants are the CTSOB and the Detective Bureau.

Police Supervisors:
  • Sergeant II: (/)
Sergeant II are experienced supervisory staff members, they are the highest non-commanding members in the department and understand how the department operates. They are often tasked with guiding Sergeant I's on their journey into their supervising duties. These members of the Supervising Staff are often tasked with handling minor duty infringements and must report those to their superiors. Sergeant IIs have shown great interest in progressing further their career into the department, they are often tasked with leadership tasks on the field such as assuming the lead role in assigning tasks during situations, organise patrols, enforce call sign usage. Unlike Sergeant Is which also carry out such duties, Sergeant IIs are assistant watch-commanders and as a result, they may assist their Lieutenants on handing out assignments to all other units below their rank.

  • Sergeant I: (/)
The entry rank to the Supervisory Staff. The Sergeant I rank is given to those which have shown interest in proceeding their career towards a supervising aspect, you will be trained in supervisory duties, such as organizing your fellow officer and friends during the day, as well as handling disciplinary action should the need arises on volunteers, and overall try to mould them into a cohesive unit and be sure they perform their work efficiently. Only those with a long stay in the department will be able to apply for this position. For you to make a good Sergeant, you must be able to set your emotions aside and be impartial.

Police Detectives:
  • Detective III: (/)
Detective IIIs are experience detectives within the department. Once a person reaches the rank of Detective III they are assigned command over one of the Detective Bureaus' units. They report directly to the Chief of Detectives or the Police Captain, however on day to day duties they must still obey orders from Police Sergeants and Lieutenants. Detectives holding this rank are often also tasked with forwarding warrants to the Warrant Hub for approval and assigning detectives to cases within their unit.

  • Detective II: (/)
Detective IIs are those which sucessfully completed their Detective I training period within the Detective Training Program. These can now work on cases by themselves and have reaches a reasonable level of understanding on detective duties within their respective unit. They can now go unmarked by themselves, their main task is to gather intel and evidence which may be used by Sergeants in roll briefings as well as in cases within their unit. They must still report to Police Supervisors on information not pertaining to their cases.

  • Detective I: (/)
These are individuals which showed interest in joining the Detective Training Program, they are on the same rank hirearchy standpoint as a Police Officer III+1. They are still learning the basics of detective policing and as a result can not go on duty by themselves, they are assigned to a specific unit within the Detective Bureau and must learn from their seniors. After a couple months as a Detective I and having obtained reasonable experience they are eligible for promotion to Detective II.

Field Officers:
  • Police Officer III+1: (/)
These are individuals themselves who, by accepting the promotion to this rank, are the first ranks to be forced to keep a decent forum and in-game activity. When you reach this rank, it means that you are already a senior member of the department and that you have received a qualification allowing you to fulfil more roles such as being a fledged member of a specific division. Needless to say, a failure to keep activity can result in a demotion to PO-III, members in this rank have shown their interest in joining the Sergeant Training Program and as a result must now start to study and learn by attenting STP sessions and patrols with the Officer in Charge of the Sergeant Training Program. After a few months obtaining reasonable experience and completing their STP they are presented with the Supervisor exam, uppon passing it they are promoted to the rank of Sergeant I.

  • Police Officer III: (/)
This is the rank that most members of the department wish to achieve. Police Officers-III are officers who have proved themselves to be trusted with a larger arsenal of tools. These officers are referred to as the field training officers of the department's core. They are accustomed to field duties and can handle as well as take charge in most situations appropriately. They are often full-fledged members of a division. All Police Officer IIIs have the ability to reject the promotion as they automatically become Field Training Officers. At this rank they have the option to apply to join either the Sergeant Training Program or the Detective Training Program.

  • Police Officer II: (/)
This is the rank that any lad will wish to achieve first in their career in the group. Police Officers-II are officers who showed to be competent and reasonable human beings, who passed the first two probationary phases and are considered full-fledged members of the department. These officers are referred to as the department's core. They are accustomed to field duties and can handle most situations appropriately, they are also often part of divisions and partake in their additional duties.

  • Police Officer I:
This is the rank assigned to the newly promoted Academy Students which performance is satisfactory to move further into their career. As a PO-I you have been trained the basic of law enforcement, and you are trusted with a uniform, a cruiser and overall the ability to think with our own mind and conduct your duties as a police officer and the freedom to perform your duties alone. These officers have recently passed the academy's theoretical phase or rejoined the department and are still getting used to the department. They may not be part of a division as they have still much to learn.



In order to benefit of the human resources available in the best way possible, the San Andreas Police Department is segregated into several levels described below.

Bureau - A section that consists of divisions and units, which is lead the by Police Captain (Lieutenant can be assigned as Second in Command in some cases).

Division/Unit - A special branch belonging to a certain bureau, with no specific rank requirement as far as the divisional command is concerned. Divisional structure varies among divisions. An example of a division is the Metropolitan division, serving under the Counter-Terrorism and Special Operations Bureau. An example of a unit is the Gangs and Narcotics unit, serving under the Detective Bureau.

Click here to read and view the Department's Structure and information pertaining to its Bureaus.

Deputy Chief of Police James Robinson
Internal Affairs Commanding Officer | Chief of Detectives
San Andreas Police Department - "To protect and serve"


Online Spike

  • SA:MP Manager
  • [SA:MP] Deputy Chief of Police
  • *******
  • Posts: 854
  • A leader leads by example, not by force.
  • With us since: 30/04/2013
    YearsYearsYearsYearsYearsYears
  • Badge-ID: #100
  • SA-MP: James_Robinson
Re: San Andreas Police Department - MANUAL [2019]
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2019, 12:40:25 pm »
Radio Communications



The SAPD is not the only group that puts up a fight against crime inside the State of Argonath. Hence is why the radio communication system has been implemented, these communications allow us to co-operate with other Law Enforcement Agencies, such as the FBI, for example. As a method of professional communications, there exist certain "codes", which are mutually understood. They enhance the co-operation and increase the professionalism we are aiming for. It's of great importance that you are familiar with the codes and their meaning. The following codes are in use.


Radio codes:
Code 1 - An instruction to acknowledge a call. Units that are the target of a 'code 1' must immediately identify themselves and reply to the request.
Example: Command Officer: "KING-2 to 5-ADAM-10, code 1." Unit: "5-ADAM-10, copy."
Code 2 - A non-emergency response to a certain situation, without the use of lights and sirens. Officers responding 'code 2' may exceed the speed limit, however, to a reasonable extent.
Code 3 - An emergency response to a certain situation, with the use of speed, lights and sirens.
Code 4 - No further assistance is required.
Code 4 ADAM - No further assistance required although a suspect is still in the area. Officers that acknowledge a 'code 4 ADAM' must scan the area for a reasonable amount of time, on the look out for the suspect.
Code 6 - Out of vehicle, conducting investigation.
Code 6 ADAM - Out of vehicle, conducting an investigation, requesting assistance.
Code 8 - Attending fire scene.
Code 10 - Bomb threat situation. If not sure, a "possible code 10" should be transmitted instead.
Code 14 - Resuming regular activity.
Code 30 - Officer in danger, all units must immediately stop what they are doing and respond to the location of the said incident.
Code 33 - Keep radio clear for emergency traffic only.
Code 37 - Vehicle is reported stolen.
Code 100 - In position to intercept.
Code purple - Serious gang activity, only a Police Officer III+1 or above can use this code. If not sure, a "possible code purple" should be transmitted instead.


Ten/Hundred Codes:
10-0: Caution
10-3: Stop transmitting
10-4: Message received, understood
10-6: Unavailable for backup calls, available for emergency calls
10-7: Unavailable for backup calls, and unavailable for emergency calls
10-8: Available for Backup Calls
10-15: Criminal in custody
10-16: Pickup Suspect
10-19: Return(ing) to station
10-20: Report your location
10-22: Disregard last assignment
10-23: Standby more to Follow
10-25: Report in person to _____
10-31: Crime in Progress
10-33: Roll Call [STATION] (Respond to the station being called, fully armed on the briefing room. SERGEANT II+)
10-38: Stopping suspicious Vehicle
10-42: Call EMS
10-50: Traffic Accident
10-53: Officer down
10-66: Suspicious person
10-67: Call for help (911 call)
10-76: En-route to location (on the way)
10-80: Active pursuit
ETA: Estimated time of arrival
10-97: Arrived at scene

148: False 911 call
187: Homicide
207: Kidnapping [If not certain its "Possible"]
211: Robbery [If not certain its "Possible"]
240: Assault
415: Causing a disturbance
417: Person with a gun
480: Hit and Run
487: Grand Theft Auto
502: Drunk Driving
505: Reckless Driving
510: Speeding or Racing Vehicles

Ethnicity Codes:

IC1 - White.
IC2 - Black.
IC3 - Hispanic.
IC4 - Middle Eastern, Arabic.
IC5 - Asian.
IC6 - Unknown ethnicity.

Radio Terminology:
Officer needs Help - All units respond to the given location imediately code 3.
Clear - Available for calls from said location
Standby - Wait for a second transmission to clarify.
Disregard - Don't take the last transmission into account.
Go ahead - Proceed with your transmission.
Come in - Respond to this transmission.



Callsigns

An active duty unit is identified by a callsign in order to make its responsibilities clear and to increase field and situational awareness.

A callsign is composed of the unit name (ID) followed by the callsign for regular uniformed patrols that includes, LINCOLN, ADAM, MARY. If there are two units you should use (Driver ID)-CALLSIGN-(Passenger ID). This does not apply to callsigns which are non-uniformed, for example, DAVID and CHARLES are used without any additional IDs. Other specialised units are assigned callsigns as they are deployed, for example, if there are no HOTEL units you use HOTEL-1, if there is one already you use HOTEL-2 and so on.

When going on duty you should report "[RANK] [NAME] #[BADGE NUMBER] Start of Watch from [LOCATION]"
When going off duty you should report "[RANK] [NAME] #[BADGE NUMBER] End of Watch from [LOCATION]"

When using /carsign they can be shortened down, for example, "10-A-20". However in /callsign they should be written in full.

STAFF - Staff Officers - Responsible for supervision of the San Andreas Police Department all its Bureaus and personnel. STAFF-1 is a unique callsign to the Chief of Police and STAFF-2 is a unique callsign to the Deputy Chief of Police.

KING - Command Officers - Responsible mainly for supervision and scene management, however, it may exceed that based on the unit's discretion. Only a Lieutenant or above can operate under this callsign.

ROBERT - Supervisory Officers - Responsible for field supervision, the handling of supervisor requests and the management of field units. Only a Sergeant I or above can operate under this callsign.

ADAM - Basic Unit consisting of 2 officers or more - Responsible for the response to emergency and non-emergency calls, the handling of 911 calls, and generally the conducting of police tasks. Any police officer can operate under this callsign.

LINCOLN - Basic Unit consisting of 1 officer - Responsible for the response to emergency and non-emergency calls, the handling of 911 calls, and generally the conducting of police tasks. Any police officer can operate under this callsign.

MARY - A motorbike unit - Responsible for the response to emergency and non-emergency calls, the handling of 911 calls, and generally the conducting of police tasks. Any police officer can operate under this callsign. The police motorbike is used for this type of patrol.

X-RAY - Air unit - Assisting ground units during pursuits and searches for suspects. Any police officer can operate under this callsign. The police maverick is used for this type of patrol. Exceptions can be made with permission from any command member.

FRANK - Detective Unit - Responsible for the conducting of tasks pertaining to the Detective Bureau. Only detectives, and Under Cover personnel may operate under this callsign.

DAVID - Special Weapons and Tactics Unit - Responsible for the conducting of tasks pertaining to the SAPD's Special Weapons and Tactics. A select variety of vehicles can be used when performing DAVID duty. Only Platoon D personnel can operate under this callsign.

CHARLES - Crime Suppression Unit - Responsible for the conducting of tasks pertaining to the Crime Suppression Unit. A select variety of vehicles can be used when performing CHARLES duty. Only Platoon C personnel can operate under this callsign.

COBRA - Specialized Air Response Unit - Responsible for the conducting of tasks pertaining to the Specialized Patrol Services. Only SPS Qualified personnel can operate under this callsign.

OSCAR - Canine Unit - Responsible for the support of Department field and detective operations in the search of outstanding felony suspects, misdemeanour suspects armed with a firearm, lost and missing persons, and evidence. Only SPS Qualified personnel can operate under this callsign.

HOTEL - High-Speed Unit - Responsible for the efficient response to pursuits involving relatively fast vehicles. Only SPS Qualified personnel can operate under this callsign. Certain restrictions exist. HOTEL units may only be deployed with the permission of a Sergeant I or above. This permission is cancelled once the authorizing member goes off duty. Patrols under HOTEL may not last more than 40 minutes and can only be authorized by a Sergeant II or above.

OCEAN - Marine Unit - Responsible for the efficient response to situations involving waterborne threats. Only SPS Qualified personnel can operate under this callsign. The Squalo, the Predator and the Coastguard are used.

TOM - Traffic Unit - Responsible for a traffic enforcement orriented patrol. Only TEU personnel can operate under this callsign.

UNION - Internal Affairs - Callsign used by Internal Affairs investigators conducting an investigation.



Deputy Chief of Police James Robinson
Internal Affairs Commanding Officer | Chief of Detectives
San Andreas Police Department - "To protect and serve"


Online Spike

  • SA:MP Manager
  • [SA:MP] Deputy Chief of Police
  • *******
  • Posts: 854
  • A leader leads by example, not by force.
  • With us since: 30/04/2013
    YearsYearsYearsYearsYearsYears
  • Badge-ID: #100
  • SA-MP: James_Robinson
Re: San Andreas Police Department - MANUAL [2019]
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2019, 12:40:37 pm »
Scale of Force


The scale of force, otherwise known as the "force curriculum" is broken down into levels. Each level is designed to be flexible as the need for force changes as the situation develops. It is common for the level of force to go from level two to level three, and back again in a matter of seconds.

Level 1 - Officer Presence
The mere presence of a police officer in uniform or in a marked police unit is often enough to stop a crime in progress or prevent most situations from escalating. Without saying a word, the mere presence of a police officer can deter crime by the simple use of body language and gestures. At this level, gestures should be non-threatening and professional. This "zero" level of force is always the best way to resolve any situation if possible.

Level 2 - Verbal Commands
Used in combination with a visible presence, the use of the voice can usually achieve the desired results. Whether you say, "Stop.", "Don't Move.", "Be quiet.", "Listen to me.", "Let me see your ID.", or, "You're under arrest."-- voice commands in conjunction with your mere presence will almost always resolve the situation. The content of the message is as important as your demeanour. It’s always best to start out calm but firm and non-threatening. Your choice of words and intensity can be increased as necessary or used in short commands in more serious situations.

The right combination of words in combination with officer presence can de-escalate a tense situation and prevent the need for a physical altercation. Training and experience improve the ability of a police officer to communicate effectively with everyone he/she comes in contact with.

Level 3 - Empty Handed Techniques
Certain situations will arise where words alone will not reduce aggression. This is the time police officers will need to get involved physically. This is a level of control employed by police officers minus the aid of equipment or weapons. There are two subcategories called, “soft empty hand techniques” and “hard empty hand techniques.”

Soft Empty Hand Techniques:
At this level, a minimal force would involve the use of bare hands to guide, hold, and restrain -- applying pressure points and take down techniques that have a minimal chance of injury.

Hard Empty Hand Techniques:
At this level the use of force includes kicks, punches or other striking techniques such as the brachial stun or other strikes to key motor points that have a moderate chance of injury.

Level 4 - Less than Lethal
When the suspect is violent or threatening, more extreme, but non-deadly measures must be used to bring the suspect under control or affect an arrest. Before moving to this level of force, it is assumed that less physical measures have already been tried.

Pepper spray results in considerable tearing of the eyes, as well as temporary paralysis of the larynx, which causes subjects to lose their breath. Contact with the face causes a strong burning sensation. Pepper spray, once thought an effective street tool for police officers has lost popularity over the years because of its ineffectiveness, especially on intoxicated persons.

The typical baton is a round stick of various lengths and is made of hardwood, aluminium or plastic composite materials. A blow with a baton can immobilize a combative person, allowing officers to effect an arrest.

Of all the options available at this level, the Taser is the most effective. The Taser discharges a high voltage spark (50,000 volts) at very low amperage. The Taser fires two small darts, connected to wires, which drops a suspect at a non-contact distance. These devices are easily carried. They are lightweight and affordable. Extensive training is not required, and they may be more effective on persons under the influence of PCP and other drugs who do not respond to chemical irritants. They can be especially useful for controlling non-criminal violent behaviour, such as persons who are mentally impaired, or under the influence of mind-altering substances.

Level 5 - Deadly Force
If a police peace officer has probable cause to believe that a suspect poses a significant threat of death or serious physical injury to the officer or others, then the use of deadly force is justified. By the very nature of the profession, peace officers may at times be confronted with a potentially lethal threat. In most of these instances, peace officers will have no other option but to discharge their firearm in order to protect their life or the lives of others.

The use of force is an integral part of a law enforcement officer's job, particularly when arresting criminal suspects. No one disputes that police should be permitted to protect themselves and others from threats to safety, but what is often disputed is an officer's assessment of a threat and the level of force selected to counter it. As a general principle, the level of force used should be tailored to the nature of the threat that prompted its use.


Scale of Force was researched from:
Here as we decided to go with a realistic system to reduce the number of times we have to use weapons. As well as try to de-escalate situations.

Deputy Chief of Police James Robinson
Internal Affairs Commanding Officer | Chief of Detectives
San Andreas Police Department - "To protect and serve"


Online Spike

  • SA:MP Manager
  • [SA:MP] Deputy Chief of Police
  • *******
  • Posts: 854
  • A leader leads by example, not by force.
  • With us since: 30/04/2013
    YearsYearsYearsYearsYearsYears
  • Badge-ID: #100
  • SA-MP: James_Robinson
Re: San Andreas Police Department - MANUAL [2019]
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2019, 12:40:47 pm »
Evidence, Arresting & Detainment

Evidence

Bodycams and Dashboard cameras:
All on-duty SAPD personnel are issued with a body camera the moment they go on duty. It is attached to the uniform and the blocking or tempering of the recording device is strictly prohibited and will result in a discharge and suspension. The body camera records both audio and video and it is role-played that you turn in all the footage at the end of your shift.

This is also true for dashboard cameras on departmental vehicles.

Probable cause, reasonable suspicion and search regulations.
Reasonable Suspicion is an objectively justifiable suspicion that is based on specific facts or circumstances and that justifies stopping and sometimes searching (as by frisking) a person thought to be involved in criminal activity at the time see also reasonable cause at cause compare probable cause at cause, terry stop.

Probable cause generally refers to the requirement in criminal law that police have adequate reason to arrest someone, conduct a search, or seize property relating to an alleged crime. Probable cause to search exists when facts and circumstances known to the officer provide the basis for a reasonable person to believe that a crime was committed at the place to be searched, or that evidence of a crime exists at the location.

Frisking, searching and seizing:
A police officer must have a reasonable suspicion that a crime has been, is being, or is about to be committed by the suspect. Or the officer reasonably suspects that the suspect is armed and dangerous, the police may frisk the suspect, meaning that the police will give a quick pat-down of the suspect's outer clothing. The frisk is also called a Terry Stop or Terry Frisk.

When can you conduct a search of a person/vehicle?

- The officer conducting the frisk was given consent;
- The officer has probable cause to believe there is evidence of a crime in your vehicle;
- In emergency situations which threaten public safety or the loss of evidence;
- The officer reasonably believes a search is necessary for their own protection (a hidden weapon, for example); and
- The person in question was arrested and the search is related to that arrest (such as a search for illegal drugs).

You must always conduct a Terry frisk looking for weapons before placing a suspect in your cruiser, you can then conduct a much more in-depth frisk at the station. You can only seize narcotics, illegal weapons or any other objects that may have been obtained illegally.

A police officer stopping a person must be able to point to specific facts or circumstances even though the level of suspicion need not rise to that of the belief that is supported by probable cause.

Detaining a suspect

A detention is the process when a law enforcement officer lawfully restricts the liberty of a person for an amount of time. Detaining the suspect should be your first step as an attending police officer, and detentions do not necessarily lead to arrests.

Drawing the attention of the suspect and getting them to comply should be your first course of action as a police officer. You should verbally instruct them to get on the ground, by shouting if necessary. This verbal command should be clear and understandable, and not conflicting with the orders of other police officers on the scene. Once they comply, one police officer should move in to restrain the suspect while the others provide cover.

In case they begin to run away, you should warn them and proceed to tase the suspect if the taser deployment regulations were met or a supervisor has requested deployment of a taser while taking into account the surroundings as well as the circumstances at hand. For example, if they draw a firearm, do not use the taser as it is dangerous, you must unholster your service firearm. If you do intend to tase them, you must state verbally that you are deploying a taser for other officers to be made aware.

When in a position to cuff the suspect, remain cautious, as they may show intent to escape or become aggressive. If they are indeed becoming aggressive and decide to attack you, you should use your non-lethal weapon (preferably a nightstick, since it's one person) to contain the suspect and possibly immobilize them by striking the back of their knee. It is a modern policing method that is not lethal and if exercised well, leads to the easy apprehension of the suspect.

Conducting a brief terry search of the suspect's outer clothing will enable you to identify any weapon that is hidden around the waistline as well as areas where a weapon would reasonably be placed. If you had a reason to arrest the suspect before you reached the point of frisking them, you may carry on with the instructions described below. If not, as in if your first intention was to detain the suspect based on the suspicion that they committed a crime and are armed, your frisk should be limited to from where one can seize immediate control of a weapon, and must not be intrusive.

In addition, if your first intention was to detain the suspect based on a suspicion that they committed a crime, but you do not possess sufficient cause to believe that they are armed, you may not conduct the search described above. But if you do possess that sufficient cause an illegal substance, for example, is clearly visible to you, you may confiscate it and arrest the suspect for the possession of such. Remember, this is still in the case of your intention being one of simply detaining the suspect. On the other hand, if your first intention was to arrest the suspect, you may conduct the search described above and follow what is stated in the following section.




Arresting a suspect

In order to arrest a suspect, you must possess sufficient evidence to charge them with a crime. Crimes that are punished by way of fines or citations are not enough to arrest someone. Arrested suspects are charged and processed in jail.

During an arrest, you should prioritize the first three steps of the scale of the use of the force if the suspect is non-compliant and resisting arrest.

    • Officer presence
    • Verbal commands
    • Empty Handed Techniques

Followed by:

  • Less than Lethal (usage of baton, pepper spray or taser)
  • Lethal force (if the situation starts to threaten the officer's or civillian's life)

Assuming the above procedures were completed, your next course of action would be to perform a Terry search on the suspect. Lead them to your cruiser and have them spread their legs. You can separate them yourself if necessary.

When searching the suspect, look for weapons. Once the search is done, state their charge(s) and announce that they are under arrest. Only read the Miranda rights when the suspect is about to be questioned, meaning an interrogation. (Not an investigation)

Once you've managed to identify the suspect, use the MDC to check if any outstanding charges were already on them. Add the current charges to their record using the suspection command. Have the suspect secured inside your vehicle, and begin to transport them to the nearest station.

Once you arrive at the station, if there is probable cause to book the suspect before jailing him (such as if he was involved in a felony crime) you may conduct a full frisk of his person looking for smaller items.



Deputy Chief of Police James Robinson
Internal Affairs Commanding Officer | Chief of Detectives
San Andreas Police Department - "To protect and serve"


Online Spike

  • SA:MP Manager
  • [SA:MP] Deputy Chief of Police
  • *******
  • Posts: 854
  • A leader leads by example, not by force.
  • With us since: 30/04/2013
    YearsYearsYearsYearsYearsYears
  • Badge-ID: #100
  • SA-MP: James_Robinson
Re: San Andreas Police Department - MANUAL [2019]
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2019, 12:40:59 pm »
Traffic Stop Procedure


A traffic stop is the temporary detention of a driver for a minor traffic infraction, according to the Constitution. A traffic stop is commonly associated with the term 'routine'. Officers of the San Andreas Police Department have several guidelines in their reach, in order to perform a safe traffic stop that upholds the standards of the department. For non-standard traffic stops, namely, felony stops, refer to the next chapter.

    Pulling the vehicle over
    In order to pull the vehicle over, the officer must activate his emergency lights and sirens while using the megaphone to communicate with the driver, using clear instructions to pull over to the right side of the road and turn off the engine.

    First assessment
    Considering the unpredictable nature of traffic stops, the officers who are performing one must assess the circumstances in hand. The type, brand of the vehicle, number of occupants, location of the vehicle, etc, must be taken under consideration and reported over the police radio.

    Mobile data computer check
    The officer must use the mobile data computer to gather some essential information regarding the vehicle being pulled over. He or she must run the said vehicle's plate number ((ID)) on the computer to verify the ownership of the vehicle, as well as any outstanding charges against the driver. If there are any, the officer must convert to a felony stop.

    Radio communication and approaching the vehicle
    The passenger must notify, through the police radio, the other units of the ongoing traffic stop, including vital information not limited to: type and brand of the vehicle, colour, number of occupants, plate number, location, assistance if required. Once that is done, the officers may approach the vehicle, in a safe manner that reduces any sort of risk. The cover officer must stand near the passenger side, while the contact officer near the driver side. Both officers should keep an eye on any suspicious objects visible inside the vehicle while approaching the occupants. The contact officer should begin by greeting the driver, then asking for his or her documents. He should then return to the vehicle and run the documents making sure they are validated and that they match the owner of the vehicle. The officer must then specify which infractions were committed by the driver and may proceed to write a citation if needed. If not, a verbal warning is sufficient. At the end of the traffic stop, the passenger must inform the other units of the end of the traffic stop.

Deputy Chief of Police James Robinson
Internal Affairs Commanding Officer | Chief of Detectives
San Andreas Police Department - "To protect and serve"


Online Spike

  • SA:MP Manager
  • [SA:MP] Deputy Chief of Police
  • *******
  • Posts: 854
  • A leader leads by example, not by force.
  • With us since: 30/04/2013
    YearsYearsYearsYearsYearsYears
  • Badge-ID: #100
  • SA-MP: James_Robinson
Re: San Andreas Police Department - MANUAL [2019]
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2019, 12:41:11 pm »
Felony Stop Procedure


A felony stop or "high-risk" traffic stop occurs when there is a strong reason to believe the vehicle contains a driver or passenger suspected of having committed a felony/serious crime, especially of a nature that would lead the police to believe the suspect(s) may be armed. Felony stops require extra attention and safety measures to result in a successful arrest.

Pulling the vehicle over
In order to pull the vehicle over, the officer must activate his emergency lights and sirens while using the megaphone to indicate to the driver to pull over to the right side of the road and turn off the engine. Once the vehicle is pulled over, the passenger must use the radio to announce a felony stop, clearly describing the location, as well as vital information. Whilst waiting for other units, the officer must instruct the occupants to keep their hands visible at all times. Make sure your park your cruiser in a way that it would provide you cover. When executing a felony stop, always request DAVID or Charles (in that order) to take point. If unavailable the highest ranked officer shall take point.

First responder
Once a unit has arrived at the scene of the felony stop, it must form a two by two arrangement side by side with the other cruisers. The initiating officer must order the driver to roll down their window and throw out their keys, keeping their hands visible at all times. Once the keys have been ejected, officers on scene - except the initiating driver - may step out of their vehicles, firearms drawn at the suspect's vehicle.

Verbal instructions, securing the suspects and the vehicle
The initiating unit must begin to clearly instruct the occupants (in order, starting from the driver) to step out of the vehicle, with their hands in the air, facing away from the officers. Once the driver has taken enough distance from the door, he must be ordered to lift his shirt up, and turn three-sixty (360) degrees, in order to check if there is anything dangerous on their torso. If no guns are or threats are visible proceed to the next step. Ask the suspect to walk backwards thowards the sound of your voice until you say STOP. Ask the suspect to lay on his stomach or ask him to put his hands up and interlock his fingers behind his head. The same process applies to all the occupants. Once all the occupants are outside the vehicle, the officers on scene must proceed by securing every suspect individually. Additionally, if there are enough officers, a group can be assigned to secure the suspect's vehicle, moving progressively from the right side, while the rest are securing the suspects. Normal arrest procedure applies to the suspects.




Special Thanks to:
-Lionel Valdes
-Jimmy "Doggi" Novak
-Jake Parker
-Spike
-Jason J. Dilworth

Deputy Chief of Police James Robinson
Internal Affairs Commanding Officer | Chief of Detectives
San Andreas Police Department - "To protect and serve"


Online Spike

  • SA:MP Manager
  • [SA:MP] Deputy Chief of Police
  • *******
  • Posts: 854
  • A leader leads by example, not by force.
  • With us since: 30/04/2013
    YearsYearsYearsYearsYearsYears
  • Badge-ID: #100
  • SA-MP: James_Robinson
Re: San Andreas Police Department - MANUAL [2019]
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2019, 12:41:22 pm »
Last Updated:
10/07/2019

Latest Edit:
Added information pertaining to the recent Structural Changes

Deputy Chief of Police James Robinson
Internal Affairs Commanding Officer | Chief of Detectives
San Andreas Police Department - "To protect and serve"